The Dainty Barbarian

The Dainty Barbarian

  1. Thou shalt respect thy neighbor. Every player will respect the other players. If someone looks like they’re “doing the wrong thing” in-game, let them do it. People make mistakes, character’s make mistakes, characters don’t have all the facts, or (just like people) may not use all of the facts in making decisions. Characters are people, and most people don’t make logical decisions. The only circumstance in which it’s okay to jump-in to ‘help’ is if they forget the game mechanics for something or actually ask the other characters in-game for advice. If the GM thinks a really bad mistake is happening, there will be clarifications (‘so you want to swing naked from a third floor balcony across the inferno on a rope to kick the dragon in the teeth?’ the line between badass and suicidal can be thick or thin).
  1. Thine GM is not a perfect repository of rules. Know the rules that apply to your character. If you have trouble remembering a lot of complex rules, write them down on a supplemental sheet and attach it to your character.
  1. They art but Guidelines. The rules-as-written don’t always make sense for a given circumstance. It is at the GM’s discretion to modify or completely replace rules as fit for a situation.
  1. To argue is Folly. If the DM forgets about a rule, feel free to remind him. If he changes a rule, argue not until after the session.
  1. Interrupt not. The GM interrupts, as necessary to describe the world and its reactions. When it’s another’s turn, remain unintrusive.
  1. Fuckery is met with Misfortune. Fuck around beyond a reasonable limit, and you’ll have a bad day. Fuckery is funny sometimes, and it’s okay to have fun, but don’t be a shitbag and break the suspension of disbelief by humping every mayor’s wife or skinning rats at dinner (unless everyone else is so engaged, then feel free).
  1. Thine character knows not omniscience. Character knowledge versus player knowledge. Separate them. Your character’s actions should come from the character’s motivations, not what you know (or estimate) the best path to be. If your character is unsure, he can ask for advice in-game. If the player is unsure, try the GM.
  1. RolePlaying Game. ‘Tis what we’re playing. It is not a video game. There are no invisible walls. There are no unattackable characters. There are no limits to what your character can do besides your imagination and the limitations of your character’s ability and knowledge. Puzzles don’t have one answer. You can pick the lock, kick the door-in, trick the guard into opening the door, drink a potion and go through it, light the door on fire and wait for the occupants to run out, disintegrate the door, turn the door into a curtain of moss, break the wall next to the door. If you can think of a way past the door, and your character could possibly do that thing, you can try it.
  1. Rule of Cool. If the GM thinks “this should happen”, there just may be a better chance that it will. Be creative.
  1. Growth. Your character is a person. People grow, sometimes worse, sometimes better, not always different from what they were, but everything that happens to a person, and therefore a character, impacts the way they think, what they do, who they respect and who they don’t, and why. They loose faith, they find faith, they give in, they get a second-wind. They feel joy, love, hate, and pain, or they wonder why they don’t, they don’t always make sense. This isn’t a video game, the story will adapt to how your character acts, what decisions she makes, even if only in a small way. She can say no, she can change sides, she can die and return as a ghost. You help create the story, it is not pre-written for you!

The Dainty Barbarian

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